Maker Time

My friend Joe McCann was riffing on a busy meeting schedule this upcoming week. I could relate and shot back a response on Twitter. I’ve fought this for years and thought I’d write a quick blog about it.

One of my favorite habits that I’ve followed from time to time is scheduling what I call “Maker Time”. After starting appendTo four years ago, my day to day work is filled with meetings, writing emails and generally solving problems of all shapes and sizes.

The transition to this role from being a full time software developer left me wishing for the days where I could sit and code all day long without interruptions. I loved software development and I loved the challenge creating something new. Even though a long day of coding could be exhausting if I didn’t keep up my caffeine intake levels, it never felt like work because the act of creating something was motivation to keep going.

Paul Graham wrote an amazing essay that describes the differences between managers and makers and the schedules they each keep. I read this early in my career and was influenced by it quite a bit. However, I always thought managers and makers were mutually exclusive roles.

It’s only as I’ve stepped into more full time management that I’ve discovered that building in “Maker Time” has been foundational to keeping my sanity. Rather than choosing between being a “Maker” OR a “Manager”, I realized I needed to choose both to stay balanced.

Maker and Manager

I’ve solved this by forcing myself to make time each day to “Make” something. Anyone who’s in a management role knows that if you don’t make time for it, it won’t happen. So, I generally schedule my own “Maker Time” for the first two hours of my day. This is when our virtual office is most quiet and I can easily focus.

I view this Maker Time as foundational to my role as a Manager, managing people who make stuff. Putting in the effort to make something every day makes me a better manager and helps keep the priority level high for “Maker Time”.

Maker Time Rules

Along the way I’ve developed a short list of rules to keep myself accountable to my “Maker Time”. I’m not a very religious habit person and I view life more like jazz music then a line dance, but guidelines like these help keep me pointed in the right direction.

  1. Schedule “Maker Time” first to keep it a priority. I generally find 2 hours a day works for me.
  2. Shut out all distractions to keep focused.
  3. Ship something by the end of each session. It could be a blog post, piece of code or an update to a contract template, but create something new and SHIP IT.

That’s it, it’s literally that simple. Sometimes, my maker time feels like the most productive part of my day. Other times I feel like I get nothing done. What matters to me is that I am keeping my creative muscles strong and focused. It is a discipline that I feel makes me a better manager, but to really measure that you’d have to ask my team.

If you’re a manager, do you make time to make something? If you’re a maker, what do you think of a manager who prioritizes “Maker time”?

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.